Understanding Painful sex
after menopause

Painful sex due to menopause is a symptom of a chronic condition called vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA).

VVA is a common condition that affects up to about half of all post-menopausal women in the US.

VVA is a common condition that affects up to about half of all post-menopausal women in the US. Symptoms of VVA include dryness, irritation, painful urination, and painful sex.

How VVA Affects the Vaginal Area

After menopause, hormonal changes can lead to a variety of physical changes to the vagina, such as the loss of vaginal tissue, lubrication, and flexibility.

Before menopause, there is good blood flow to the vaginal tissue, the vaginal lining is thick and moist, and the vaginal walls are flexible. After menopause, there is less blood flow to the vaginal tissue, the vaginal lining thins and becomes dry, the vaginal flexibility decreases, and the vagina becomes narrower and shorter. Before menopause, there is good blood flow to the vaginal tissue, the vaginal lining is thick and moist, and the vaginal walls are flexible. After menopause, there is less blood flow to the vaginal tissue, the vaginal lining thins and becomes dry, the vaginal flexibility decreases, and the vagina becomes narrower and shorter.

Hot flashes and night sweats are common symptoms of menopause that are widely known and treated. But symptoms like vaginal dryness and painful sex often go undiscussed and untreated.

Your healthcare provider may call painful sex dyspareunia (pronounced dis-pu-ROO-ne-uh), which is the medical term for this condition.

For a while, I was suffering in silence. I had been experiencing painful sex to the point I stopped sex almost completely.
– Norine K.

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Indication

INTRAROSA vaginal inserts are a prescription medicine used in women after menopause to treat moderate to severe pain during sexual intercourse caused by changes in and around the vagina that happen with menopause.

Important Risk Information

Do not use INTRAROSA vaginal inserts if you have vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by your healthcare provider.

Before using INTRAROSA vaginal inserts, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have, have had, or think you may have had breast cancer. Prasterone, an ingredient in INTRAROSA vaginal inserts, is changed in your body to estrogen. Estrogen medicines are not for use in women who have, have had, or think they may have had breast cancer.

The most common side effects of INTRAROSA vaginal inserts are vaginal discharge and changes on Pap smear.

These are not all of the possible side effects of INTRAROSA vaginal inserts.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-10881-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Patient Information in full Prescribing Information.